Home

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As a parent, sometimes I feel like much of my time is spent correcting my kids. I know it exasperates them. It’s not much fun for me either. But I’m trying to raise them to be responsible and respectable. Not because I want them to be successful. I mean, of course I want them to be successful, but more importantly, I want them to be responsible and respectable because those qualities are important to me. I often feel I’m fighting an uphill battle in a society that seems to teach that everything is always someone else’s fault and you are entitled to just about anything for no other reason than the fact that you want it. So I correct them, I take away privileges and I wonder if any of it ever sinks in. Don’t get me wrong. I’m not a drill sergeant or anything. I just feel like one at times.

But recently, after one of my kids experienced a difficult and bitter disappointment, I was reminded that one of the most important jobs as a parent is to be here for my kids; to make sure they know that no matter how big and bad this old world is, there is a place where there is acceptance and love. This place called home.

“Home is the one place in all this world where hearts are sure of each other. It is the place of confidence. It is the place where we tear off that mask of guarded and suspicious coldness which the world forces us to wear in self-defense, and where we pour out the unreserved communications of full and confiding hearts. It is the spot where expressions of tenderness gush out without any sensation of awkwardness and without any dread of ridicule.” ~Frederick W. Robertson

I’m staring out into the night, trying to hide the pain
I’m going to the place where love
And feeling good don’t ever cost a thing
And the pain you feel’s a different kind of pain

Well, I’m going home, back to the place where I belong
And where your love has always been enough for me
I’m not running from, no, I think you got me all wrong
I don’t regret this life I chose for me
But these places and these faces are getting old
So I’m going home, well I’m going home

The miles are getting longer, it seems, the closer I get to you
I’ve not always been the best man or friend for you
But your love remains true and I don’t know why
You always seem to give me another try

So I’m going home, back to the place where I belong
And where your love has always been enough for me
I’m not running from, no, I think you got me all wrong
I don’t regret this life I chose for me
But these places and these faces are getting old

Be careful what you wish for ’cause you just might get it all
You just might get it all and then some you don’t want
Be careful what you wish for ’cause you just might get it all
You just might get it all, yeah

Oh, well I’m going home, back to the place where I belong
And where your love has always been enough for me
I’m not running from, no, I think you got me all wrong
I don’t regret this life I chose for me
But these places and these faces are getting old
I said these places and these faces are getting old
So I’m going home, I’m going home

This post is part of the One Word at a Time Blog Carnival: Home, hosted by my friend Peter Pollock. To read more on this topic, please visit him at PeterPollock.com

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10 Responses to “Home”

  1. Simply Darlene June 13, 2011 at 10:55 pm #

    Ah, home has morphed through several ideals and taken on new meaning with all of our recent moves and relocations. I used to think it was about four walls and a roof, but I’ve found it’s more about the arms that hold you inside of those walls.

    I hope your kiddo is doing okay.

    Blessings.

  2. Glynn June 14, 2011 at 6:21 am #

    I remember — a decade or more ago — when my oldest learned one of his closest friends had committed suicide. Being there was the single most important thing we could do. Good post, Kathy.

  3. Helen June 14, 2011 at 9:47 am #

    You are a great mom. I should know. I had one myself! 🙂

  4. floyd June 14, 2011 at 11:54 am #

    It is usually the hardest thing to do the right thing as a parent. The times when our children are crushed by the reality of this world is some of the best times to be a parent. We never want our kids to suffer, but that is reality in this fallen world. That’s when in hindsight we learn, “There’s No Place Like Home”…

  5. Lisa notes... June 14, 2011 at 12:01 pm #

    Even now that my oldest has moved out, I still like having all my children back “home” at the same time. There’s just always something special about home. I’m sure you’re doing a great job raising your kids with strong character.

  6. Hazel Moon June 14, 2011 at 12:47 pm #

    You are a good mother to correct your children so that they will learn respect and responsibility. Being there when they are disappointed is important too. This is inevitable, but when they know you care, this comforts them, even in their pain.

  7. Matt June 14, 2011 at 1:30 pm #

    I bet your kids appreciate your help. At least they know you care. I’ve seen a lot of parents who are so hands off it looks like they could care less what their kids do or happens to them.

  8. Louise June 14, 2011 at 7:48 pm #

    Being there is sometimes all we can do to allow them to be where they are.

    Great post Kathy!

    Love that song.

  9. Lynn Mosher June 14, 2011 at 8:06 pm #

    They will rise up and call you blessed! They will appreciate all you’ve poured into them. And you will be proud! Great heartfelt post, Kathy. Thank you!

  10. Nancy June 14, 2011 at 8:23 pm #

    That song just slays me. It came out the year my daughter left for college. Now that my kids are grown, I wonder about the times I drew lines in the wrong places between love and grace. So thankful that God’s grace fills up the places where we are lacking as parents. Stopping over from the blog carnival.

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